Tag Archives: Tulips for Breakfast

The course on haiku included in Haiku Bridges

Happy to see my course on haiku for Parkinson’s Art aiming at people living with #Parkinson‘s, their families, and friends, being included in HAIKU BRIDGES, the new feature of The Haiku Foundation!

HAIKU BRIDGES is a new periodic feature from The Haiku Foundation designed to encourage and communicate significant haiku outreach initiatives to new audiences.

Scott Mason, running the feature, invites suggestions of such initiatives for possible inclusion in a future post.

I copy the post below:

Regular readers and writers of haiku recognize that their haiku practice confers personal benefits beyond the literary—it offers the therapeutic values that come with mindful awareness plus a felt connection with their surroundings. The nonprofit organization Parkinson’s Art, through its Parkinson’s Art Academy, will be offering those with Parkinson’s Disease and their families, friends and care partners a free eight-session course on haiku and haiku-related forms starting on September 18th. The online course was designed and will be conducted by Stella Pierides, a Member at Large of The Haiku Foundation board.

The mission of Parkinson’s Art is “to inspire and develop creativity across the Parkinson’s community.” Through its Academy the organization currently offers courses ranging from the visual arts (“Drawing & Painting Portraits”) to the literary arts (“Poetry Without Fear”).

Jan Sargeant, Director of Literature in the Arts at Parkinson’s Arts, states: “We are delighted to provide our audience with the opportunity to experience the power and beauty of this deceptively complex form of poetry. And we’re just thrilled to have someone as accomplished and committed as Stella to teach it.”

For more information, visit Parkinson’s Art.

Trevor Woollard, who set up the organisation noted that a lot of the major charities in the sector focus – rightly so – on exercise. But there are huge numbers of people who are less mobile or not sport-orientated or don’t have that kind of ability. And they’re often forgotten.

Exercise is important – but so is exercising the mind and soul.

I am looking forward to the course. Haiku, the shortest of poems, packs quite a punch!

Tulips for Breakfast: Parkinson’s Art

Recently, during my internet meanderings, I came across a very exciting international community of people with Parkinson’s: Parkinsons.art

They are

… a registered, non-profit organisation run by artists and writers living with Parkinson’s Disease. It is a voluntary initiative with 100% of every donation and funds raised going directly to Parkinson’s charities and supporting arts projects within the community. Parkinson’s Art works closely with Parkinson’s UK as well as supporting other Parkinson’s related organisations.

Parkinson's

The mission of Parkinsons.art is to:

Promote the benefits of art to those affected by Parkinson’s Disease

Provide a platform to collaborate and share artwork

Showcase Parkinson’s art and raise awareness through exhibitions and events

The original brainchild of Trevor Woollard, Parkinson’s Art is run by a small team of dedicated volunteers with expertise in various art disciplines ranging from painting through photography and sculpture to prose and poetry.

Their first major exhibition, ‘VIVID Dreams 2020,’ will be held at the Oxo Tower in London, UK, from 18-29 August 2021. Vivid dreaming is a symptom of Parkinson’s. The exhibition (and the accompanying catalogue) reflects this experience in a selection of artwork and poetry. There’s a virtual aspect to the exhibition, too: an app with augmented reality that allows people to view the exhibited works of art on their own walls.

Parkinson’s Art also runs the Parkinson’s Art Academy, which offers a variety of free courses on literature and the fine arts. It taps into the wealth of experience existing in the community of Parkinson’s, which includes many amazing artists.

I am pleased to say that I am joining this wonderfully creative group: I will be offering, in the autumn, an introductory course on haiku. More about this soon …

P.S. You can now pre-order the official ‘VIVID Dreams – London’ catalogue. This A5 book contains all the paintings from the VIVID Dreams 2020 exhibition, plus a selection of poetry and stories of inspiration from the Parkinson’s community.
Check it out here: https://instagr.am/p/CRLczldsANU/

Tulips for Breakfast (2)

April 11, 2021 is World Parkinson’s Day. Check out live events and Parkinson’s Community videos in honor of the day on YouTube here

Interested in finding out about Parkinson’s Disease? The Michael J. Fox Foundation describes it as follows:

Parkinson’s disease (PD) occurs when brain cells that make dopamine, a chemical that coordinates movement, stop working or die. Because PD can cause tremor, slowness, stiffness, and walking and balance problems, it is called a “movement disorder.” But constipation, depression, memory problems and other non-movement symptoms also can be part of Parkinson’s. PD is a lifelong and progressive disease, which means that symptoms slowly worsen over time.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation has a wealth of information for those wishing to understand the disease, as well as the newly diagnosed.

Another good place to start is the Davis Phinney Foundation which offers a plethora of useful information. The site also features performance poetry by Wayne Gilbert who, using metaphor, describes his experience of living with this disease.

Did you know that a number of people with Parkinson’s find it helpful to personify the disease, to see it as an enemy to fight against? From Journeys with Parkinson’s, the personal blog of Frank C. Church, in the first three out of Ten Things to Keep You Living and Not Just Existing With Parkinson’s, the disease is presented as an opponent of the person with PD:

What makes you happy? Think about it; think deeply about what do you do every day that makes you happy. Your Parkinson’s will not like you being happy.

Stay busy; be active every day for many hours during the day. Do not just sit. Your Parkinson’s would prefer to have you sedentary doing as little as possible.

Make sure you get plenty of sleep and the best quality kind of sleep. You know you used to get it before you had Parkinson’s. Your Parkinson’s would prefer to do whatever it can to keep you from sleeping because you being tired and listless gives an advantage to Parkinson’s.

Finally, here is a video of a Belgian septuagenarian with Parkinson’s who took up boxing to alleviate her symptoms:

More soon…

Tulips for Breakfast

Highlighting articles, blog posts, news, poems, films about living with Parkinson’s in honor of Parkinson’s Awareness Month and beyond.

April is Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month, set aside each year for drawing attention to this little understood and still under-researched neurodegenerative disease that affects around 10 million people globally (with numbers growing rapidly). At the center of this observance is World Parkinson’s Day April 11. Patients, families, care workers, support groups use the month, and the day, to heighten awareness of the disease as well as inform of the resources that are needed / available to support those afflicted by it.

April is also National Poetry month in the United States, with April 17 set to celebrate international Haiku Poetry Day. Poets, publishers, teachers of poetry, librarians, poetry lovers come forward to inform about, promote and celebrate poetry the whole month. The Haiku Foundation honors International Haiku Poetry Day (IHPD) with HaikuLife, the yearly Film Festival, and EarthRise Rolling Haiku Collaboration, a poem written by haikuists on the day, from sunrise to sundown around the world.

Since both Poetry and Parkinson’s are of particular relevance to me, I will be posting links to interesting articles, information, and Parkinson’s poetry in this blog.

Here is my favorite poem about Parkinson’s (the first one of four) by Robin Morgan:

A post by Minter Krotzer on her husband Hal Sirowitz’s need to keep the disease secret as long as possible, illustrates a common problem faced by people with Parkinson’s known as staying in the Parkinson’s closet! In her post The hardest Secret, she observes, “It’s interesting to me that people aren’t in the closet about many things anymore but they are about disease.”

And here you will find Michael J. Fox‘s story, one of the most well-known figures in the Parkinson’s world, diagnosed in 1991:

A detailed and brave description of personal experience of the disease and the healing practice of Haiku, titled Haiku and Parkinson’s Disease, by Tim Roberts, can be found in the New Zealand Poetry Society website

I hope that my posts will make a small contribution to addressing the heart-breaking dilemma those afflicted with PD find themselves in: on the one hand, the stigma associated with this disease, which creates and reinforces the need to stay in the closet and so deprive those living with it of the support there is; and, on the other, the paucity of information about the disease, which leads to and feeds misunderstanding and stigmatization.

If you are wondering about the title of this post: A red tulip is the symbol chosen for Parkinson’s Disease.